Cultural Meeting pics

Below are some pictures of the cultural meeting held last Monday at the Leslie Johnson Memorial Center, supplied by the Italian Consulate.
  

Zuma Must Fall

Sample pictures from today’s demonstration outside Parliament in Cape Town. An unprecedented number of people stretched all the way down Plein Street and all the way down Roeland to Buitenkant Street.

 

March against Human Trafficking

A march protesting Human Trafficking took place yesterday 21 March (Human Rights Day) from Keizersgracht Road to the gates of Parliament in Cape Town, where a memorandum was handed over to a representative of Parliament by Mrs Bernadette Kibe, Secretary of the St Anne’s Sodality. Archbishop Stephen Brislin (as well as several priests) also participated in the march and the Archbishop offered a prayer for the police. The march was organised by the St Anne’s Sodality of the Archdiocese of Cape Town and Justice & Peace were also represented. Below are a selection of pics of the event.

 

Archdiocesan Directory 2017

The 2017 Archdiocesan Directory is now available from Cape Town’s Catholic Bookshop, selling at a price of R110.

148 A5 pages, fully indexed, brimming with up to date contact details of everything Catholic in the Archdiocese of Cape Town: Chancery Administration, Chaplaincies, all Catholic Organisations & Programmes, Priests’ & Deacons’ Contact Details, Religious Orders, a quick guide to Sunday Mass times, a detailed Parish section, Catechetics Co-ordinators, Catholic Schools, a 2017 Liturgical Calendar, Anniversaries of Deceased Clergy, History, A Quick Guide to the Archdiocese, and much, much more…

Get your copy from the Catholic Bookshop (The Grimley building, 14 Tuin Plein, Cape Town) or place an order to have one posted to you, at 021 465 5904.

 

 

 

 

 

Year of Mercy Confession Times

In order to encourage people to go to Confession during this Year of Mercy, below is a list of Confession times in all the parishes of the Archdiocese of Cape Town, ordered alphabetically according to Parish. Should you require contact or address details, just click on this link and it will take you to a listing of the parishes on our website: http://adct.org.za/parishes/

ATHLONE: ST MARY OF THE ANGELSSat 16.30-17.15 & on request
ATLANTIS: ST JOHN THE BAPTISTSat 16.30-16.55
BELGRAVIA: REGINA COELI16.30-17.15
BELHAR: STS JOHN & PAULSat 16.30-17.20
BELLVILLE: OUR LADY OF FATIMASat 16.00-16.45
BELLVILLE SOUTH: HOLY FAMILYOn Request
BERGVLIET: HOLY REDEEMERThu 19.00, Sat 09.00, 17.00-18.00
BETTY’S BAY: OUR LADY OF MONTSERRATOn request
BONTEHEUWEL: ST MATTHEWSat 16.15-16.45 or by appointment
BOTHASIG: GOOD SHEPHERDSat 16.00-16.45
BRACKENFELL: ALL SAINTSOn request before each Mass
BREDASDORPOn request
BRIDGETOWN: OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSELSat 16.30-16.55
BROOKLYN: OUR LADY OF THE ASSUMPTIONSat 09.00
CALEDONOn request
CAMPS BAY: ST THERESASat 17.40
CATHEDRALSat 09.00-10.00, 17.00-17.45
CLANWILLIAM: ST MARIA GORETTIOn request
CLAREMONT: ST IGNATIUSSat 17.30-17.45
CLOETESVILLE: ALL SAINTSSat 09.00-10.00 at St Nicholas, Stellenbosch
CONSTANTIA: OUR LADY OF THE VISITATIONSat 16.45-17.20
CONSTANTIA: SCHOENSTATTOn request
CROSSROADS (Lower): OUR LADY QUEEN OF AFRICAOn request
CROSSROADS (Old): ST JOSEPHINE BAKHITAOn request
DELFT: JUBILEE CHURCH OF ST LAWRENCEWed 18.00-18.45, Sat 16.30-17.45
DISTRICT SIX: HOLY CROSSHalf an hour before all Masses
DURBANVILLE: OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELPSat 09.30 & 17.00 (changes advertised a week in advance)
ELSIE’S RIVER: ST CLAREWed 18.15-18.45, Sat 16.30-17.15
FACTRETON: ST LUKESat 09.00-11.00
FISH HOEK: ST JOHN THE EVANGELISTSat & Tue 17.00
FRANSCHHOEKOn request
GANSBAAI: ST PETER THE FISHERMANOn request
GOODWOOD: ST JOSEPHSat 10.00-11.00, 16.45-17.15
GRAAFWATER: ST AUGUSTINEOn request
GRABOUW: OUR LADY OF GRABOUWOn request
GRASSY PARK: OUR LADY QUEEN OF PEACESat 16.45-17.45, Thu 19.00-19.30
GREEN POINT: SACRED HEARTWed & Fri 12.45 or by appointment
GREEN POINT: ST MARGARET MARYTue 08.30, Sat 17.15 or by appointment
GREYTONOn request
GUGULETHU: ST GABRIELSat 16.00-16.45 (St Gabriel’s)
HANOVER PARK: OUR LADY OF THE ROSARYSat 17.00-17.45
HARARE: ST THÈRÉSE OF LISIEUXSat 15.30-16.30 (alt.)
HERMANUS: OUR LADY OF LIGHTDuring Benediction & Sat 17.00-17.20
HOUT BAY: ST ANTHONYSat 17.00 (and by request)
HOUT BAY HARBOUR: OUR LADY STAR OF THE SEAOn request
IDA’S VALLEY: ST MARKSat 09.00-10.00 at St Nicholas, Stellenbosch
KHAYAMNANDISat 09.00-10.00 at St Nicholas, Stellenbosch
KHAYELITSHA: SITE BUpon request
KHAYELITSHA: ST KIZITOOn request
KHAYELITSHA: ST RAPHAELSat 15.00-16.00
KLEINVLEI: ST CATHERINE OF SIENASat 17.00-17.30 & before all weekday masses
KOELENHOF: HOLY SPIRITOn request
KOMMETJIE: ST JOSEPHSat 16.00-17.00
KOMMETJIE: ST NORBERTSun before Mass, Sat 16.00-17.00
KRAAIFONTEIN: ST ANTHONY OF PADUASat 17.15-17.45
KUILS RIVER: ST NINIANWed 18.00, Sat 17.00 or any time on request
LAAIPLEK: ST HELENA2nd Sat 17.00-17.30
LAINGVILLE: ST PETER THE FISHERMAN1st Sat 09.00-10.00
LAMBERT’S BAY: ST BARTHOLOMEWSat 10.00-11.30
LANGA: ST ANTHONYWed 17.00-17.45 or by arrangement
LANGEBAAN: STAR OF THE SEASat 17.00-17.30
LANSDOWNE: OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANSSat 09.00-10.00, 16.30-17.30
LAVISTOWN: ST MARTIN DE PORRESSat 17.00-17.25
LENTEGEUR: ST MARY MAGDALENESat 17.00-17.40 and on request
LINGALETHUOn request
LOTUS RIVER: ST CLEMENTThu 19.00-19.30, Sat (on special request)
LWANDLE: ST MONICAOn request
MACASSAR: ST STEPHEN THE MARTYRBy arrangement before Sunday Mass
MAITLAND: ST JOHNSat 16.15-16.45 or by appointment
MAKHAZA: ALL SAINTSBefore Masses
MALMESBURY: ST FRANCIS DE SALESBefore Mass during the week or on request
MANENBERG: HOLY FAMILY OF NAZARETHSat 16.15-16.45
MASIPHUMELELE: BL. ISIDORE BAKANJA45 min before Mass
MATROOSFONTEIN: HOLY TRINITYThu 18.00-18.45, Sat 16.00-16.45
MBEKWENI: ST CHARLES LWANGABefore Mass
MELKBOSSTRAND: ASCENSION COMMUNITY CENTREOn request
MFULENI: ST MATTHIASOn request
MILNERTON: OUR LADY OF THE ANNUNCIATION15 mins before Mass & Penitential Services
MONTANA: ST JOSEPH’S HOMEOn request
MOWBRAY: ST PATRICKSat 08.30-09.00, 17.00-17.20 (May-Aug); 17.30-17.50 (Sep-May) and upon request.
NEWLANDS: ST BERNARDSun 17.30
NORTHPINE: ST KEVINOn request before each Mass
NYANGA: ST MARYSun 08.45
OBSERVATORY: CHURCH OF THE HOLY NAMEAfter Sunday Mass
OCEAN VIEW: ST ANDREWSat 17.00-18.00 & Sun before Mass
OTTERY: CHAPEL OF EASEOn request
OVERBERG: OUR LADY QUEEN OF APOSTLESOn request
PAARL: ST AUGUSTINESat 17.00-17.30
PAARL EAST (HUGUENOT): OUR LADY OF DIVINE LOVEWed 18.00-18.45
PARKWOOD ESTATE: ST GERARDWed 19.00-19.30
PAROW: IMMACULATE CONCEPTIONSat 11.00-12.00
PAROW VALLEY: MATER DEISat 17.00
PIKETBERGOn request
PINELANDS: CHRIST THE KINGSat 17.15-17.45
PLUMSTEAD: ST PIUS XSat 17.15-17.45
REDELINGHUYS: ST PHILOMENAOn request
RETREAT: OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELPTue 19.00-19.30, Sat 16.30-17.15
ROCKLANDS: ST STEPHEN17.00-17.45 and on request
RONDEBOSCH: ST MICHAELSat 09.00-09.30, 17.30-17.50
RUYTERWACHT: OUR LADY OF THE ROSARYOn request
SALDANHA: MOTHER OF MERCYTue 18.00-18.40, 1st Sat 09.00-10.00
SALT RIVER: ST FRANCISOn request
SCOTTSDENE: ST OWENOn request
SEA POINT: OUR LADY OF GOOD HOPESat 17.00 -17.25
SIMON’S TOWN: STS SIMON & JUDESat 17.00-18.00 (before Mass)
SIR LOWRY’S PASS VILLAGEOn request
SOMERSET WEST: ST PAULSat 08.45-09.15, 17.15-17.45 (Oct-Mar)
Sat 08.45-09.15, 16.45-17.15 (Apr-Sep)
STEENBERG: ST ANNESat 16.30-17.15
STELLENBOSCH: ST NICHOLASSat 09.00-10.00
ST JAMES: ST JAMESSat 16.15-16.45
STRAND: ST PETERSat 16.45-17.15, 1st Fri 17.00
STRANDFONTEIN: ST PHILIPSat 16.45-17.15
SUN VALLEY: ST BRENDANOn request
TABLE VIEW: CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTIONWed 08.30, 1st Fri 08.00 & 17.30, Sat 16.45
Penitential Service during Advent & Lent
TAFELSIG: ST TIMOTHY16.45-17.15
TAMBOERSKLOOF: VILLA MARIAOn request
VILLIERSDORP: ST BARNABASOn request
VREDEHOEK: NAZARETH HOUSEThu before 1st Fri 09.15
VREDENBURG: ST JUDESat 09.00-10.00 every 3rd, 4th & 5th Sat of the month
WALLACEDENE: ST ELIZABETHOn request
WELCOME ESTATE: ST THERESASat 16.30-17.20, or by appointment
WESTRIDGE: ST JOHN BOSCO30 mins before Mass & Sat 17.00-18.00
WOODSTOCK: ST AGNESOn request
WYNBERG: CORPUS CHRISTISat 09.00-10.00, 16.30-17.15
WYNBERG: ST DOMINICOn request
YZERFONTEINOn request
ZWELIHLE: MARTYRS OF AFRICAOn request

Investiture into Knights and Dames of the Holy Sepulchre

On Sunday 8 November 2015, 29 people (including a priest and two deacons) were invested by Archbishop Stephen Brislin into the Equestrian Order of the Knights and Dames of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem at Our Lady of Good Hope Church, Sea Point. Archbishop Brislin is the prior of the Order in southern Africa. The Knights and Dames of the Holy Sepulchre, who do developmental work in the Holy Land and encourage pilgrimages there, were represented by local magistral delegate Joseph Quinn and knights and a dames of the order from Britain. Below are a few pictures of the event.

 

World Interfaith Harmony Week

On 5 February, Archbishop Stephen Brislin was invited to give a talk at the UN World Interfaith Harmony Week, organised by the SA Jewish Board of Deputies. Below is the text of his talk.

WORLD INTERFAITH HARMONY WEEK

SA JEWISH BOARD OF DEPUTIES – 5TH FEBRUARY 2015

Thank you for inviting me to share a few thoughts with you on this essential subject “The challenges of interfaith in a world of hate: can we do more to promote ubuntu?”

Sadly, history shows that people of faith are all too often part of the “world of hate” and many conflicts have – at least – a faith element. Many modern conflicts are undeniably about religion and by people of faith. This is particularly tragic as there is so much that we agree on:

  • we believe in God and that we are the created

  • we believe in the value of life and the importance of family

  • we believe in justice, peace and harmony

  • we believe in equity, care for the poor

  • we believe in compassion, mercy, forgiveness

If we are to promote Ubuntu in sincerity, we have to begin by looking at ourselves – as people of faith – and our relationship with each other. That is what I would like to address this evening.

Why do religions continue to be in conflict? It would be wonderful to be able to say that these are not religious wars. Northern Ireland, for example, was a religious war, but there were many other elements in the conflict involving economics, participation in government, discrimination. The roots may well have been in religion but it was not purely religious in nature. Many modern day violent conflicts also have elements of religion and elements of human rights issues. But not all of modern day conflicts have that “mix” – some appear to be purely religious in nature.

Peace is possible. Neighbours usually live in peace whether they are Muslim, Jew, Christian or another faith. In Cape Town Christian and Muslim have lived side by side, rubbed shoulders for centuries, and have got on together in good neighbourliness, not only tolerating each other but also caring for each other. I believe that people of faith, on a day to day level, respect people of faith, even if they are of a different faith. Presumably it is because they know each other, and know of their joys and struggles – they are human beings together.

The story is told of a family with a Christian son and a Muslim son. For years there was no difficulty. They could sit down at meals, share the tasks, talk about current issues and generally live a family life as we expect it to be lived. The day came for the two sons to make decisions about their future. Both decided to go for doctrinal studies in their respective faiths. Once they had completed their studies they could no longer sit down at a meal together without an argument ensuing. They could no longer tolerate each other. Tragically, a value they both shared – that of family – was destroyed.

Some may say that the reason for inter-faith conflict is doctrinal differences. Must we do away with doctrine to achieve peace? But teaching is integral to faith as we struggle “through a glass dimly” to know God. Besides, people well-versed in the doctrines of their different faiths

can get along well – we’re a good example of that. We work together with the objective of the greater good of society.

Tolerance and respect among faiths are not only possible but exist. But they are more likely to exist when there has been an encounter between people of different faith – when they know each other as people. When there has not been that encounter there is more chance of generalizations being made about others – often based on sensationalist media or simply ignorance.

While there are undoubtedly many causes of the vicious modern-day religious conflicts, I would suggest the following three as being important:

  1. Fear. There exists an underlying fear of each other. Considering history, I suppose that such fear is not altogether unrealistic. There is a “root of bitterness” that has not been healed, and so the past continues to negatively influence the present. A consequence of fear is obviously mistrust. If we do not or are unable to trust the motivation of others we cannot build a healthy relationship with them and it becomes a relationship of politeness rather than a genuine concern. A further consequence of fear is a tendency to isolation, to withdraw into one’s own group, the “us and them” syndrome. The more such isolation exists, the greater the “myths” about others thrive. As in the apartheid years, separation keeps people from knowing each other. It becomes easy to see others as a group, not as individual personalities with hopes, dreams and aspirations. It is easy to demonize the group. The particular is generalized, especially when it is negative. Once others are seen as demons the soil is fertile for violent conflict.

  2. Secularism: it is easy to over-react and to throw up on’s arms in despair at secularism. Nonetheless, it is a powerful force that has made many people of faith feel threatened. It has done more to lure people away from faith than any proselytization by another faith. It has attempted – in some instances at least – to push religion to the fringes of society, to ensure it stays privatized and to resist any influence of faith on governance policies. It is has provided the space to publicly ridicule faith. Considering the last point, there must always be the space for satire, of course – but the question of boundaries is always pertinent. The recent Charlie Hebdo saga is a case in point – the murderous response was clearly unjustifiable, but the deeper questions do remain. We believe in freedom of speech but has it no boundary? In any case, I suggest that secularism has led to some feeling threatened, “under attack”, even persecuted. I think it has led to a tendency to re-assert our religion, whether it be by dress code or other means, to become more uncompromising and to shrink into a “group” mentality.

  3. Unwillingness to speak out about injustice: speaking out about corrupt politicians is easy, but when it comes closer to home it is much more difficult. There are a number of issues here. The first one is illustrated by the example of traditional Christian communities in the Middle East who lived in relative security under dictatorial regimes. They feared that if this strong authority disappeared, chaos and extremist groups would take over. Thus, they tended to defend those regimes; instead, loyalty to their faith and concern for the good of their country should have perhaps led them to speak out much earlier, telling the truth and calling for reforms. There is the danger that self-interest can cause us to be silent even when we recognize the truth.

A second aspect is co-option by civil authority. We know this well from our own history in South Africa, when there was co-option of some religions, but there are many examples. Vigilance in this regard is always necessary because such co-option is insidious. Attempts by civil authority to co-opt faith will never end. Such co-option destroys our integrity, our commitment to truth and justice, as well as polarizing us from other faiths. Sadly, we as the Catholic Church, historically went much further than simple co-option – we governed countries. There may have been some good in the motivation – Europe was no garden of Eden, was in chaos, and threatened by violent brigands. But inevitably, greed, power and exclusion of others formed part of the motivation. We live with the consequences until today, not only in terms of our relationships with other faiths and Christian denominations, but also in terms of our relationship inter nos, among ourselves. I am told that in certain areas of Italy, for example, that you cannot mention the name of the Pope without people spitting and cursing. They have no problem with the present Pope or generations of Popes of the past – in goes back to the Papal states when taxes were imposed on people. The discontent has been passed on from generation to generation. Another example is how Christianity became closely associated with colonialism, the effects of which remain with us to the present day. Simply put, when faith and political power become too closely intermingled, faith suffers and there are severe, long-lasting consequences.

And so how do we promote the values of ubuntu in a world of hate without first promoting our own common beliefs of compassion, mercy, tolerance, justice, peace and harmony among ourselves? Inter-faith movements are essential, we have an enormous responsibility on our shoulders to keep doors open, to dialogue, to speak to each other. Some criteria necessary for the success of that are:

  1. Our own commitment to be honest in our aspiration to live and concretely promote among our own adherents the values we profess and believe in: family, respect for life, the dignity of each person, tolerance, justice, peace.

  2. To be humble. This is a lesson that Pope Francis is emphasising and teaching by example. So many of the conflicts of the past – and the present – were caused by sheer arrogance. As people of faith we are only to aware of our finiteness, our creature-status and our inability to “box” God is our own categories.

  3. To be careful of the language we use. More and more we hear people talk about “persecution” of Christians, for example. Often it indicates a superficial understanding of situations, and it is emotive language that can establish a mindset leading to violence.

  4. To recognize that in our faith-groups we are not united. Christianity provides a good example. Up until the 11th century there was one Church, the Catholic Church. Then there was the split into the Latin Church and the Orthodox Church. In the 16th Century Martin Luther protested and this led to the Lutheran Church and later to Protestant churches. I heard the figure recently that today there are 53,000 Christian denominations. There are two points here: firstly, we are not always sensitive to the nuances of different streams within other faiths; secondly, there are extremist groups in most faiths. Regarding the latter point: there is a need to discourse and dialogue within our own faiths and, in fidelity to what we believe, we must have the courage to denounce extremism when it threatens and indeed breaches the values we believe in, when there is blatant injustice. We have to be able to say “not in my name”.

  5. As mentioned before, the relationship we have with political power needs continual vigilance and reflection. Prophet should not try to be king: we need co-operation and mutual respect, but nonetheless we need boundaries. Certainly we wish to influence, to comment, to guide. But when faith and politics become equated it is a recipe for disaster.

  6. As I have mentioned, it is easy to demonize people when there is a group mentality and polarization. One of the advantages of inter-faith forums is that we can practically work together on programmes and projects that benefit society. Such projects need to go beyond leadership and to include adherents, to get people rubbing shoulders with each other – allowing them to see people as people.

  7. Finally, I strongly believe that we have to establish peace groups or movements that transcend faith differences, drawing from our common beliefs, I have no blueprint for this or particular vision, but I believe that there is an urgent need, a responsibility that we have, to work for the things that make for peace. We all cherish and believe in peace. Surely, this – more than anything else – is something that we can work towards, not only to build bridges, but to be faithful to the God who created us.

+Stephen Brislin

Catholic Archbishop of Cape Town

5th February 2015

The Faith Delusion?

CDs from Winter Living Theology 2013
‘The Faith Delusion?’ with John Moffatt SJ

Last year Fr John Moffatt travelled five cities across South Africa helping people to explain faith in the face of reason.
His lectures were deep and insightful and were not afraid to tackle difficult topics such as evolution, science, revelation, and conflicts between Church teaching and modern morality.For those who missed the lectures, and those who would like to hear them again, we have good news for you.
A set of 8 CDs of the lectures is now available on sale at a price of R200.00 plus R50.00 for posting
To order a set, or for more info: Email – WLT@jesuitinstitute.org.za
John Moffatt is a British Jesuit working in South Africa. He studied Classics at university and since joining the Jesuits has done further studies in Philosophy and Theology. His main work in the UK has been as teacher and chaplain in the
Jesuits’ high schools in London and also as university chaplain at Oxford. He has become particularly interested in questions surrounding faith and reason and in developing a positive dialogue between traditional Christianity and secular culture.